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nanowrimo 2010

Louderblog

Diary of a Blind Madman

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Another thing missing from my life
Man of Bronze
louderback

A favorite movie of mine is lost to me for a while. I'm going to order a new copy of Orphans from Amazon or some such after Christmas. It is a sentimental tale with an unusual cast … Albert Finney, in a performance for which he got a British "best actor" equivalent (I don't know what it's called there), Matthew Modine in one of his earliest roles, and the relatively unknown (though he's been in 20 or more films) Kevin Anderson who turns out an excellent performance.

The movie was brought to my attention by my son Jon, who did not warn me what an emotional flick it was. I've watched the movie with almost all of my boys. Lu and had to forego that but I know he has seen the film. I am relatively certain that it was he who once asked me if I had a song that went with me the way The Prisoner's Song went with Albert Finney's character Orphans. At that time I told him no, though I remember thinking that if I had such a song it was Waltzing Matilda and that it was not something I was going to tell anyone about. Now it turns out that I think I do have such a song, have always had - though I didn't know it. An old Irish tune floats across my mind and in and out of my life fairly regularly. I've forgotten it so completely that I couldn't remember as much as a word of it much less the title, then remembered or rediscovered it more than once over the years. It's The Minstrel Boy. Not long ago I found a couple of different sets of words and saved them. Might even have posted them here. Very romantic theme. I watched, yesterday, The Man Who Would Be King and was astounded that it was a wonderful movie. I seem to remember thinking it a "B" movie at best. *sigh* my memory plays me false again and again. Naturally, the song was in the movie. It was in the Anglican Hymn version which is something like The Warrior and starts out with "The Son of God hath gone to war" instead of the traditional Irish "The minstrel boy hath gone to war." Both versions use essentially the same tune, though the cadence in the hymn is quite different, less military.

Gad. I have just bored myself. I'm going to bed.