nanowrimo 2010

Louderblog

Diary of a Blind Madman

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Writing and distraction
nanowrimo 2010
louderback
Today's Lyric:
As he falls to eternity the truth is fading
Part of him died long time ago but still there's death awaiting
Warrior's Quest
Ensiferum

Recently Played Songs:
         I'm having a very hard time keeping it together today. I feel fragmented. I went to my neurologist Dr. Highhorse. I was so distracted and disaffected that I failed the altzheimer's test (remember three words... repeat them later, spell a word, spell it backwards). I never could spell anything backwards. I don't compartmentalize well lately.

         I'm actually quite concerned with my degenerating mental acuity. I feel as sharp as ever, but I know I'm slower and that my appalling tendency to repeat myself had risen to a fever pitch. Still worse (well, from my standpoint, not yours) I now tend to forget conversations. I find that my sister is very irritated at the fact that I can't remember having with her the same conversation "three or four times".

         I've done a little checking, and my journal entries sometimes repeat themselves. Bleeeech!

         Now is ze time on Schprokets vhen ve write!

The Tale of the Thief's Lover
She entered the village of Higroth from the East at the second hour of the morning and her arrival was a sensation. It was though, quite a quiet sensation. She was seen by those women of the town who had business out of doors at that hour. A few of the local gaffers who gather before the smith's shed to sip the beer he brews and gossip saw her as well and took note of her manner of dress. She wore bright gypsy colors, an embroidered vest of black and gold, a silken blouse of brilliant royal blue with puffy sleeves gathered at the bicep and the wrist by red garters, and pantaloons. Pantaloons! On a woman! This jarring note disguised from all but one of the men the fact that she wore a pair of expensively embroidered and buckled riding boots. She was seen to walk down the center of Higroth's one street to the carter's barn which served also as the store for all of the purchasable commodities in the village. The carter, Mr. Olgen, dutifully reported to his subsequent customers her taciturn requests for all the goods one might need to set up housekeeping and support oneself for a week or two. She asked also to whom belonged the field of yellow flowers about a minute's walk from the Easternmost house in Higroth (the widow Gaalmaren's).

She was not seen again in the village for five days, but her doings were observed in detail by men walking to their daily work in the farm fields to the East. Many a man with a Western farm found reason to offer assistance to some friend of his working in those Eastern fields. About the dinner tables of Higroth, there was but a single topic for gossip — the round house "She" was building. Square a-center in a field of flowers rose some two dozen poles formed of slender trees that had been stripped of their branches. The poles were long and buried deep. Felling them meant she had worked like a daemon for those five days, because in addition to those poles she had amassed, a sizable pile of wood in larger diameters was rapidly being split into planks.

Her return to the carter's store was, of necessity in a village the size of Higroth, almost as great a sensation as her first appearance. She was dressed quite suitably this time in long skirt of the dark heavy fabric she had purchased and a shirt of the light linen women of the village favored. When had she had time to sew? Her companion attracted as much attention as she. He was a big man, taller than any in Higroth, but without great bulk. He had a powerful look about him, his shoulders broad and his bare arms and chest beneath the embroidered vest she had worn before, muscular and sharply defined. He had the narrow waist and graceful move of a dancer or an athlete. He wore no cap and his long hair, as raven-black as hers was tied behind in a ponytail that reached his lower back. Men envied him his youth, his physique and his companion. Not always in that order. Women looked from him to their husbands and kept their own counsel.

They purchased a quantity of goods from the carter and inquired after a few items that he did not have in stock. It was obvious from the nature of their purchases (paid for in copper coins and silver by weight) that they were setting up a home. The carter promised them he'd look into those other items when next he took his cart abroad for supplies. They made more than one stop this time. The smith received an order for hearth implements and various gear for both cooking and heating. A special order with carefully drawn specifications provided pleased the smith greatly. They paid half in advance and accepted his schedule for delivery without quibbling. They inquired of him if anyone in the village made brick. When told that there was not they settled it among themselves to make them on their own.

The information provided by this visit kept the inhabitants a-buzz for several nights. She was Sofeera and he Aegrem. Their names placed them from the South, though, perhaps, not far South. They were married. They were not as young as first thought, being each of twenty-five summers. Their reckoning if their ages by "summers" caused many of the locals to think them of a rural origin where reckoning of time in seasons rather than days was much more common than in the cities. Higroth thought itself quite modern in that the village's central fountain was decorated with a series of pegs used to track each month and its progression of days.

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